Today’s inspiration comes all the way from Alwar, India.  I am so honored to have Andy Lepper write for us this week.  Andy runs a non-profit called No Longer Orphans and is ‘Papa’ to 35 boys at Shiloh Children’s Home in Alwar.  I had the pleasure of meeting Andy and his wife Susan while traveling in India with friends.  We got to stay at the boys home, they fed us, took care of us and we watched 35 happy, rambunctious, well-adjusted boys play, laugh and take care of each other.  They are truly memories and people I will never forget. Today’s post is about the little things… 

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If you didn’t know, I live in India. My wife and I run a children’s home. Some might call it an orphanage. We have 35 boys. I see some pretty amazing things. Some of them make me laugh. Some of them make me cry. Some of them make me think.

Today was a thinking kind of day. I encountered a few things worth writing about.  I will share one experience with you.

I was having a nice leisurely ride on my motorcycle when I passed him. At first I didn’t catch what he was doing. He was slumped over on his hands and knees on the asphalt picking something up. That something was grains of wheat.

As I became aware of what he was doing I got a wider look. And don’t judge me, but I stopped to watch and didnt help. About 20 feet ahead was his motorcycle with a 50 pound bag of wheat on it. Something had happened and the bag had lost some of its content. But not much. Maybe a pound of grain at the most.

But here was this man on his hands and knees picking up one pound of wheat that was spread out over 20 feet. I repeat, On his hands and knees. WHY? Was he so poor that this was his family’s rations for the month and that 1 pound meant a day that his children wouldn’t eat? Or was he afraid of what his boss might say if he found out a mistake had happened? I will never know the reason he was so intent on rescuing a pound of wheat, one grain at a time.

But what strikes me the most is his intensity for such a little thing. The truth is that he probably could ration the remainder and stretch it so the loss is minimal to his family. The truth is also that his boss probably would never actually know that some was missing if that was the reason.

This smallest of things mattered to him. You could tell that each grain had value to him.

Seeing this turned my thoughts to my 35 boys, my 35 Indian men in training. You see, life is made up of thousands of small events that get overshadowed by the handful of major events. These small events make up our days, our weeks, our years. It’s these little things that make us who we are. I will have thousands of encounters with each one of my boys. So the question I pose to myself is whether I see the value in these small events as they happen. Do I cherish the tiny things that make up the whole of our lives? Do I recognize the importance of one of my little ones who slips his hand in mine when he wants comfort? Do I enjoy the times where they look at me searching for affirmation? These moments are building my young boys into men. Do I value the moments I have with each boy, even if no one will ever know? 

What are the small things worth to you? Even if no one would ever find out, do you value the insignificant things like this Indian man?

Luke 16:10   One who is faithful in a very little is also faithful in much, and one who is dishonest in a very little is also dishonest in much.

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MandiCrocker note:  Please consider donating to No Longer Orphans.  Having been there, I have seen these donations in action.  Every dollar goes to these boys, I promise you that, and the need is great. Money also stretches in India so even small contributions help! Below are some pictures I took of the trip.

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Stacy showing the boys the pictures of them on her camera.

Stacy showing the boys the pictures of them on her camera.

 

One of the boys showing me his coloring.

One of the boys showing me his coloring.

 

Little shoes.

Little shoes.

 

Chickens outside the orphanage.

Chickens outside the orphanage.

 

Some of the sweet boys.

Some of the sweet boys.

 

The boys have shoes but much prefer being without them!

The boys have shoes but much prefer being without them!

 

Boys being boys!

Boys being boys!

 

One good kick!

One good kick!

 

Playing.

Playing.

 

This little cutie was constantly being taken care of, picked up and dragged around by all of the other boys. They watch out for each other.

This little cutie was constantly being taken care of, picked up and dragged around by all of the other boys. They watch out for each other.

 

More playing!

More playing!

 

This little guy was everywhere!

This little guy was everywhere!

 

And fast as lightening!

And fast as lightening!

 

Homework time

Homework time

 

Too fascinated with my cell phone to study- ha!

Too fascinated with my cell phone to study- ha!

 

Drying clothes.

Drying clothes.

 

What the boys home looks like inside. Huge big room, and old British construction.

What the boys home looks like inside. Huge big room, and old British construction.

 

Love these kids.

Love these kids.

 

More drying clothes... 35 boys currently there!

More drying clothes… 35 boys currently there!

 

The "kitchen."

The “kitchen.”

 

Bible school time

Bible school time

 

The boys were so excited to have apples, an expensive fruit in India.

The boys were so excited to have apples, an expensive fruit in India.

 

My friend, and Stacy's husband Lucas, playing with the kids.

My friend, and Stacy’s husband Lucas, playing with the kids.

 

New flip flops for the boys thanks to The Jamie Sheth Foundation.

New flip flops for the boys thanks to The Jamie Sheth Foundation.

 

The boys just got some but grew out of them so fast!

The boys just got some but grew out of them so fast!

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